Skull

Foramen Spinosum

Foramen Spinosum The structure indicated is the foramen spinosum. The floor of the cranial cavity consists of three cranial fossae: Anterior cranial fossa Middle cranial fossa Posterior cranial fossa There are several holes in the floor of the cranial cavity which allow structures to enter and exit the skull, known as foramen. Foramen (foramina is plural), are holes in the human body which allow other structures to pass through. In the case of the skull, foramina permit the passage of arteries, veins and nerves. The middle cranial fossa consists of the following foramina: Superior orbital fissure Foramen rotundum Foramen ovale …

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Cribriform Plate

Cribriform Plate The structure indicated is the cribriform plate. The cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone sits lateral to the crista galli and has numerous foramen which permit the passage of the olfactory nerves which pass from the nasal mucosa to the olfactory bulb. Learn more about the bones of the skull in this tutorial.

cribriform plate

Foramen Lacerum

Foramen Lacerum The structure indicated is the foramen lacerum. The floor of the cranial cavity consists of three cranial fossae: Anterior cranial fossa Middle cranial fossa Posterior cranial fossa There are several holes in the floor of the cranial cavity which allow structures to enter and exit the skull, known as foramen. Foramen (foramina is plural), are holes in the human body which allow other structures to pass through. In the case of the skull, foramina permit the passage of arteries, veins and nerves. The middle cranial fossa consists of the following foramina: Superior orbital fissure Foramen rotundum Foramen ovale …

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foramen lacerum

Maxilla

Maxilla The structure indicated is the maxilla bone. The skull consists of the calvaria which contains the brain, and the facial skeleton, also known as the viscerocranium. The facial skeleton consists of the following bones: Nasal bones Lacrimal bones Palatine bones Zygomatic bones Maxillae Inferior nasal conchae Vomer The maxillae (plural) are paired bones which are located between the orbit and the upper teeth, forming the upper part of the jaw. The maxilla consists of four processes: Zygomatic process – sticks out laterally to articulate with zygomatic bone Frontal process – projects superiorly and articulates with frontal bone Alveolar process …

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Maxilla

Nasal Bone

Nasal Bone The structure indicated is the nasal bone of the facial skeleton. The skull consists of the calvaria (the part which contains the brain), and the facial skeleton (viscerocranium) which forms the anterior and inferior part of the skull. The facial skeleton consists of the following bones: Nasal bones Lacrimal bones Palatine bones Zygomatic bones Maxillae bones Inferior nasal conchae Vomer There are two paired nasal bones. The nasal bone has four articulations: Frontal bone (superiorly) Ethmoid bone (posteriorly) Maxillae (laterally) Nasal bone (medially) Learn more about the anatomy of the facial skeleton in this tutorial.

skull - nasal bone

Frontal Bone

Frontal Bone The structure indicated is the frontal bone of the skull The frontal bone is one of 8 bones which form the calvaria (the part of the skull which contains the brain). The calvaria consists of: 2 parietal bones 2 temporal bones Frontal bone Sphenoid bone Ethmoid bone Occipital bone The frontal bone consists of three parts: Squamous part Orbital part Nasal part The frontal bone articulates with the following bones: Sphenoid bones Ethmoid bone Parietal bones Nasal bones Maxillae bones Lacrimal bones Zygomatic bones The point at which the frontal bones meet the parietal bones in the midline …

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frontal bone

Parietal Bone

Parietal Bone The structure indicated is the parietal bone of the skull. The parietal bone is one of 8 bones which form the calvaria (the part of the skull which contains the brain). The calvaria consists of: 2 parietal bones 2 temporal bones Frontal bone Sphenoid bone Ethmoid bone Occipital bone The parietal bone articulates anteriorly with the frontal bone at the coronal suture. Inferiorly it articulates with the temporal bone at the squamous suture. Posteriorly it articulates with the occipital bone via the lamboid suture. It has a small articulation with the sphenoid bone via the sphenoparietal suture at …

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parietal bone

Perpendicular Plate of Ethmoid Bone

Perpendicular Plate of Ethmoid Bone The structure indicated is the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone. The ethmoid bone is one of the bones in the skull that separates the nasal cavity from the brain. There are three parts of which the ethmoid bone is comprised: Cribriform plate Ethmoidal labyrinth (one on either side) Perpendicular plate The perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone extends inferiorly from the base of the cribriform plate and contributes to the median nasal septum. It has the following articulations: Anteriorly: spine of frontal bone Posteriorly: sphenoidal crest Inferiorly: septal cartilage anteriorly, vomer posteriorly Learn more …

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Perpendicular Plate of Ethmoid Bone

Mandibular Notch

Mandibular Notch The structure indicated is the mandibular notch. The ramus of the mandible forms the lateral portion of the mandible. It has two processes: Coronoid process Condyloid process These processes extend superiorly from the ramus of the mandible. The coronoid process is located anteriorly, and the condyloid process is located posteriorly. In between these two processes is a concave notch, known as the mandibular notch. Passing through this notch are the following structures: Masseteric nerve Masseteric artery Masseteric vein Learn more about the anatomy of the mandible in this tutorial.

Mandibular Notch

Squamous Suture

Squamous Suture The structure indicated is the squamous suture of the skull. Sutures are junctions between the bones of the skull – they are a type of fibrous joint, bound together by Sharpey’s fibres. The squamous suture forms the joint of the skull between the squamous part of the temporal bone and the inferior aspect of the parietal bone. Posteriorly, the squamous suture becomes the parietomastoid suture where the mastoid process articulates with the parietal bone. Anteriorly, the squamous suture extends towards pterion. Learn more about the sutures of the skull in this tutorial.

Sqaumous Suture