Veins

Inferior Sagittal Sinus

Inferior Sagittal Sinus The structure indicated is the inferior sagittal sinus. The brain is drained by a series of veins and venous channels which drain into large dural venous sinuses, which in turn ultimately drain to the internal jugular veins. The dural venous sinuses are lined by endothelium and located between the layers of the dura mater in the brain. The venous sinuses are different to other blood vessels as they do not have the same set of layers which form their walls, and do not contain valves, like veins. In addition to the venous sinuses, there are deep veins …

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inferior sagittal sinus

Median Antebrachial Vein

Median Antebrachial Vein The structure indicated is the median antebrachial vein. The median antebrachial vein is one of the veins of the superficial venous system of the upper limb. The veins of the upper limb consist of a superficial veins and deep veins. The superficial system consists primarily of the cephalic and basilic veins which originate from the dorsal venous arch and drain into the axillary vein and brachial veins respectively. In the region of the antecubital fossa, the cephalic vein is joined to the basilic vein via a vein known as the median cubital vein. The median antebrachial vein originates …

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median antebrachial vein

Radial Vein

Radial Vein The structure indicated is the radial vein of the forearm. The venous drainage of the upper limb consists of a superficial system and a deep system. The superficial system drains to the deep system. The veins of the deep system accompany the arteries, and are known as venae comitantes which is the Latin for “accompanying veins” (vena comitans = singular). The veins which accompany the arteries are often in pairs, and are therefore frequently referred to in the plural form – venae comitantes. The radial veins are paired veins which accompany the radial artery in the forearm. The …

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radial vein

Median Cubital Vein

Median Cubital Vein The structure indicated is the median cubital vein. The median cubital vein is a superficial vein located in the cubital fossa anteriorly in the elbow, and connects the basilic and cephalic veins. The basilic and cephalic veins are two large superficial veins of the upper limb which arise from the dorsal venous network of the hand. The basilic vein arises medially from the dorsal venous network of the hand, whereas the cephalic vein arises laterally from the dorsal venous network. These two veins drain to the axillary vein. The deep venous system of the upper limb follows …

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medial cubital vein

Left Gonadal Vein

Left Gonadal Vein The structure indicated is the left gonadal vein. The gonadal veins are the veins which drain the testes in men (testicular vein) and the ovaries (ovarian vein) in women.  The left gonadal vein drains into the left renal vein, which then drains into the inferior vena cava. The right gonadal vein however, drains directly into the inferior vena cava. The inferior vena cava is responsible for carrying deoxygenated blood into the right atrium of the heart from the lower part of the body. The inferior vena cava is formed at the point of union of the right …

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left gonadal vein

Lumbar Veins

Lumbar Veins The lumbar veins are illustrated in this diagram. The lumbar veins run along the posterior abdominal wall and drain into the inferior vena cava. In addition some lumbar veins drain into the iliolumbar vein, and into ascending lumbar veins. There are several veins which drain into the inferior vena cava. The inferior cava is formed from the union of the common iliac veins, which receive blood from the pelvis and lower limbs. Draining directly into the inferior vena cava, are the following veins: Lumbar veins Right gonadal veins (ovarian/testicular) Renal veins Right suprarenal vein Inferior phrenic veins Hepatic …

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Lumbar veins

Cephalic Vein

Cephalic Vein The structure indicated is the cephalic vein. The cephalic and basilic veins are the main superficial veins of the upper limb. The cephalic vein originates from the dorsal venous network of the hand and drains into the axillary vein by passing through the deltoid and pectoralis major muscles. In the cubital fossa, which is the area located anterior to the elbow joint, the cephalic vein is joined to the basilic vein via the median cubital vein. In the clinical setting, the median cubital vein is a convenient and common location for obtaining venous access for the administration of …

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cephalic vein

Axillary Vein

Axillary Vein The structure indicated is the axillary vein. The axillary vein passes through the axilla, draining blood from the upper limb into the subclavian veins, which in turn drain blood to the brachiocephalic (innominate) veins, which unite to form the superior vena cava which then drains into the right atrium of the heart. The axillary vein is formed from the brachial and the basilic veins, and begins at the inferior margin of the teres major and ends at the lateral border of the first rib, where it then becomes the subclavian vein. Learn more about the veins of the body …

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axillary vein

Inferior Vena Cava

Inferior Vena Cava The structure indicated is the inferior vena cava. The inferior vena cava is responsible for carrying deoxygenated blood into the right atrium of the heart from the lower part of the body. The inferior vena cava is formed at the point of union of the right and left common iliac veins at the L5 vertebral level. Several veins drain into the inferior vena cava: Lumbar veins Right gonadal vein (the left gonadal vein drains into the left renal vein) Renal veins Right suprarenal vein Inferior phrenic vein Hepatic veins The inferior vena cava ascends through the abdomen …

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Inferior vena cava

Internal Jugular Vein

Internal Jugular Vein The structure indicated is the internal jugular vein. The jugular veins are responsible for returning deoxygenated blood from the head to the heart via the superior vena cava. There are two jugular veins: External jugular vein Internal jugular vein The external jugular vein drains into the subclavian vein. The internal jugular vein joins the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein. The brachiocephalic veins (innominate vein) on either side then join one another to form the superior vena cava, to bring blood into the right atrium of the heart. The external jugular vein runs superficial to the …

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Internal Jugular Vein