Thigh

Biceps Femoris

Biceps Femoris The structure indicated is the biceps femoris muscle of the thigh. The biceps femoris muscle is one of three muscles in the posterior compartment of the thigh. The other muscles are the semimembranosus, and the semitendinosus. The muscles in the posterior compartment are often referred to as the “hamstrings” muscles. Collectively, these muscles are responsible for extending the hip joint, and flexing the knee joint. The biceps femoris lies laterally, and the semitendinosus and semimembranosus lie medially. Just like the biceps muscle in the arm, the biceps brachii , which is Latin for “two headed muscle (biceps) of …

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Biceps Femoris

Iliopsoas Muscle

Iliopsoas Muscle The structure indicated is the iliopsoas muscle. The iliopsoas muscle collectively refers to the distal ends of the psoas major and iliacus muscles which exit the pelvis to enter the anterior compartment of the thigh and insert onto the lesser trochanter of the femur. The iliopsoas muscle is the strongest hip flexor. Origin: Iliac fossa and vertebral bodies of T12 to L5 Insertion: Lesser trochanter of femur Innervation: anterior rami of lumbar plexus (L2-L4) Action: Hip flexion, lateral rotation of femur Learn more about the muscles of the anterior compartment of the thigh in this tutorial.

iliopsoas

Psoas Major

Psoas Major The structure indicated is the psoas major muscle The psoas major muscle is one of the muscles which makes up the posterior abdominal wall. There are four muscles which contribute to the posterior abdominal wall: Psoas major Psoas minor Quadratus lumborum Iliacus The iliacus muscle combines with the psoas major muscle to enter the anterior compartment of the thigh and insert via a common tendon on the lesser trochanter of the femur. The iliacus and the psoas major muscles are thus collectively referred to as the iliopsoas muscle – they act synergistically to flex the thigh at the …

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psoas major

Adductor Magnus

Adductor Magnus The structure indicated is the adductor magnus muscle of the thigh. The adductor magnus muscle is one of six muscles in the medial compartment of the thigh. The medial compartments consists of the following muscles: Gracilis Pectineus Adductor longus Adductor brevis Adductor magnus Obturator externus The adductor magnus muscle is the largest muscle in the medial compartment. It lies deep to the adductor brevis and the adductor longus. It has two parts to it: Adductor part Hamstring part The adductor part originates on the ischiopubic ramus, and as the name suggests, contraction causes adduction, as well as medial …

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Adductor Magnus

Iliacus Muscle

Iliacus Muscle The muscle indicated is the iliacus muscle. The iliacus originates in the iliac fossa on the inside of the pelvic bone. The iliacus combines with the psoas major to enter the anterior compartment of the thigh and insert via a common tendon on the lesser trochanter of the femur. The iliacus and psoas are thus collectively referred to as the iliopsoas muscle – they act synergistically to flex the thigh at the hip joint, as well as acting to cause lateral rotation of the thigh. The iliopsoas muscles are the strongest hip flexors. Origin: Iliac fossa Insertion: Base …

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Iliacus

Greater Trochanter

Greater Trochanter The arrow is pointing to the greater trochanter of the femur. The greater trochanter is a large quadrilateral eminence which forms the site of origin and insertion for several muscles: Origins: vastus lateralis Insertions: gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, obturator internus, piriformis The greater trochanter has two surfaces: Lateral Medial At the base of the greater trochanter is a deep depression known as the trochanteric fossa. Posteriorly is the intertrochanteric crest. The trochanteric fossa serves as the point of insertion for four muscles: Obturator externus Obturator internus Superior gemellus Inferior gemellus The greater trochanter has four borders: Superior Inferior …

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Greater Trochanter

Semitendinosus

Semitendinosus The semitendinosus muscle is one of three muscles in the posterior compartment of the thigh. The other muscles are the semimembranosus, and the biceps femoris. The muscles in the posterior compartment are often referred to as the “hamstrings” muscles. Collectively, these muscles are responsible for extending the hip joint, and flexing the knee joint. The biceps femoris lies laterally, and the semitendinosus and semimembranosus lie medially. The semitendinosus gets its name from its structure which is comprised of a muscle belly which tapers into a long tendon that extends to insert onto the medial tibia. The semitendinosus sits on …

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Semitendinosus

Gracilis

Gracilis The muscle indicated is the gracilis. The gracilis is one of six muscles in the medial compartment of the thigh. The thigh consists of three muscular compartments: 1)      Anterior 2)      Medial 3)      Posterior The medial compartments consists of the following muscles: 1)      Gracilis 2)      Pectineus 3)      Adductor longus 4)      Adductor brevis 5)      Adductor magnus 6)      Obturator externus The gracilis is the most superficial muscle in the medial compartment. It is a thin muscle which descends vertically down the medial aspect of the thigh. Origin: inferior pubic ramus, ramus of ischium Insertion: proximal shaft of tibia medially (pes anserinus) Action: …

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Gracilis

Vastus Medialis

Vastus Medialis The vastus medialis is one of the muscles that makes up the quadriceps femoris, and is contained in the anterior compartment of the thigh. It is responsible for the tear-drop shape that is visible on the medial aspect of the thigh in trained athletes and footballers. The four muscles that make up the quadriceps femoris are the: –         Rectus femoris –         Vastus lateralis –         Vastus medialis –         Vastus intermedius   Learn more about the muscles of the anterior compartment in this tutorial. Click here to visualise and interact with these muscles.

Vastus Medialis