Ankle

Talus

Talus The structure indicated is the talus bone of the foot. The foot contains three groups of bones: Tarsals Metatarsals Phalanges The talus is one of seven tarsal bones. There are three groups of tarsal bones: Proximal group Intermediate group Distal group There are two bones in the proximal group of tarsal bones: the talus and the calcaneus. The calcaneus is the largest tarsal bone and forms the heel through its posterior projection. The talus articulates with the medial malleolus of the tibia and the lateral malleolus of the fibula to form the ankle joint. In addition, it articulates with …

Talus Read More »

Talus

Posterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament

Posterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament The structure indicated is the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament. The distal ends of the tibia and the fibula are held together by the inferior portion of the interosseous membrane. The interosseous membrane is the membrane which joins the tibia to the fibula along its entire length, separating the leg into anterior and posterior compartments. There are two apertures within the interosseous membrane proximally and distally which allow vessels to pass from one compartment to the other. In addition to the attachment of the interosseous membrane inferiorly between the distal tibia and fibula, this inferior articulation is …

Posterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament Read More »

posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament

Inferior Extensor Retinaculum

Inferior Extensor Retinaculum The structure indicated is the inferior extensor retinaculum. Retinacula (retinaculum singular) are bands of connective tissue which surround tendons and hold them in place. They function to stabilise tendons as the muscles to which they attach contract to cause movement. There are retinacula in the wrist, ankle and knee. In the ankle, there is the flexor retinaculum, the peroneal retinacula and on the extensor surface, there is the superior and inferior extensor retinacula. The superior retinaculum is situated distally in the leg just above the ankle joint, attaching to the anterior aspects of the fibula and tibia. …

Inferior Extensor Retinaculum Read More »

Inferior extensor retinaculum

Anterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament

Anterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament The structure indicated is the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament. The distal ends of the tibia and the fibula are held together by the inferior portion of the interosseous membrane. The interosseous membrane is the membrane which joins the tibia to the fibula along its entire length, separating the leg into anterior and posterior compartments. There are two apertures within the interosseous membrane proximally and distally which allow vessels to pass from one compartment to the other. In addition to the attachment of the interosseous membrane inferiorly between the distal tibia and fibula, this inferior articulation is …

Anterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament Read More »

Anterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament

Inversion of the Foot

Inversion of the Foot This diagram indicates inversion of the foot. Inversion is a movement of the foot which causes the soles of the feet to face inwards, and eversion is the opposite movement. Inversion and eversion occur primarily at: Talocalcaneonavicular joint Subtalar (talocalcaneal) joint The muscles which cause inversion of the foot are: Tibialis anterior Tibialis posterior The muscles which cause eversion of the foot are: Peroneus longus Peroneus brevis Inversion injuries of the ankle are common, and result in ankle sprain affecting the ligaments on the lateral aspect of the ankle. Most commonly, the anterior talofibular ligament (70-85% …

Inversion of the Foot Read More »

Inversion of the Foot

Anterior Talofibular Ligament

Anterior Talofibular Ligament The ankle joint has medial and lateral ligaments which help to keep it stable. As the “fibular” part of the name suggests, the anterior talofibular ligament is one of the lateral ligaments. There are three ligaments in this lateral ligament complex: anterior talofibular ligament posterior talofibular ligament calcaneofibular ligament. This ligament is the most commonly injured ligament in a sprained ankle. Since the ligament stabilises the lateral side of the ankle, you can image from seeing its position, if the ankle is forced into inversion, this ligament will come under a lot of strain leading to a …

Anterior Talofibular Ligament Read More »

Anterior Talofibular Ligament