System: Musculoskeletal

Acromioclavicular Joint

Acromioclavicular Joint The structure indicated is the acromioclavicular joint. The shoulder joint complex consists of the three joints: Glenohumeral joint Acromioclavicular joint Sternoclavicular joint The acromioclavicular joint is formed between the acromion of the scapula and the clavicle. It is a small synovial joint that is stabilised by the following ligaments: Acromioclavicular ligament (consists of superior and inferior parts) Coracoclavicular ligaments The coracoclavicular ligaments consist of two parts: Trapezoid ligament Conoid ligament Learn more about the shoulder joint in this anatomy tutorial.
acromioclavicular joint

Foramen Spinosum

Foramen Spinosum The structure indicated is the foramen spinosum. The floor of the cranial cavity consists of three cranial fossae: Anterior cranial fossa Middle cranial fossa Posterior cranial fossa There are several holes in the floor of the cranial cavity which allow structures to enter and exit the skull, known as foramen. Foramen (foramina is plural), are holes in the human body which allow other structures to pass through. In the case of the skull, foramina permit the passage of arteries, veins and nerves. The middle cranial fossa consists of the following foramina: Superior orbital fissure Foramen rotundum Foramen ovale …

Foramen Spinosum Read More »

Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis

Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis The structure indicated is the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle of the forearm. The extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle is one of 7 muscles located in the superficial compartment of the posterior forearm. The posterior forearm consists of a superficial and a deep compartment. The superficial compartment contains 7 muscles, whereas the deep compartment contains 5 muscles. The superficial compartment of the posterior forearm includes the following 7 muscles: Brachioradialis Extensor carpi radialis longus Extensor carpi radialis brevis Extensor digitorum Extensor digiti minimi Extensor carpi ulnaris Anconeus The extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle serves to abduct and extend the wrist joint. The muscles of the …

Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis Read More »

extensor carpi radialis brevis

Cribriform Plate

Cribriform Plate The structure indicated is the cribriform plate. The cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone sits lateral to the crista galli and has numerous foramen which permit the passage of the olfactory nerves which pass from the nasal mucosa to the olfactory bulb. Learn more about the bones of the skull in this tutorial.
cribriform plate

Piriformis

Piriformis The structure indicated is the piriformis muscle. The piriformis muscle is one of the muscles of the gluteal region. The muscles in the gluteal region are divided into a superficial and deep group. There are four muscles of the superficial group: Gluteus maximus Gluteus medius Gluteus minimus Tensor fasciae latae There are 5 muscles in the deep group: Gemellus superior Gemellus inferior Quadratus femoris Piriformis Obturator internus The deep muscles of the gluteal region generally serve to laterally rotate the femur. The piriformis muscle passes through the greater sciatic foramen and divides it into two spaces: Greater sciatic foramen …

Piriformis Read More »

Piriformis

Foramen Lacerum

Foramen Lacerum The structure indicated is the foramen lacerum. The floor of the cranial cavity consists of three cranial fossae: Anterior cranial fossa Middle cranial fossa Posterior cranial fossa There are several holes in the floor of the cranial cavity which allow structures to enter and exit the skull, known as foramen. Foramen (foramina is plural), are holes in the human body which allow other structures to pass through. In the case of the skull, foramina permit the passage of arteries, veins and nerves. The middle cranial fossa consists of the following foramina: Superior orbital fissure Foramen rotundum Foramen ovale …

Foramen Lacerum Read More »

foramen lacerum

Vastus Lateralis

Vastus Lateralis The structure indicated is the vastus lateralis The vastus lateralis is one of the muscles that makes up the quadriceps femoris, and is contained in the anterior compartment of the thigh. The muscles of the anterior compartment are all innervated by the femoral nerve and serve generally to extend the leg at the knee joint. The four muscles that make up the quadriceps femoris are the: Rectus femoris Vastus lateralis Vastus medialis Vastus intermedius In addition to the quadriceps muscles, the Sartorius muscle is also located in the anterior compartment together with the distal ends of the iliopsoas …

Vastus Lateralis Read More »

Vastus Lateralis

Pectineus

Pectineus The structure indicated is the pectineus muscle. The pectineus muscle is one of six muscles in the medial compartment of the thigh. The thigh consists of three muscular compartments: Anterior Medial Posterior The medial compartments consists of the following muscles: Gracilis Pectineus Adductor longus Adductor brevis Adductor magnus Obturator externus All the muscles of the medial compartment are innervated by the obturator nerve except for the pectineus (femoral nerve) and the hamstring part of the adductor magnus (tibial division of sciatic). The muscles of the medial compartment generally serve to adduct the thigh at the hip joint. Due to …

Pectineus Read More »

Pectineus

Maxilla

Maxilla The structure indicated is the maxilla bone. The skull consists of the calvaria which contains the brain, and the facial skeleton, also known as the viscerocranium. The facial skeleton consists of the following bones: Nasal bones Lacrimal bones Palatine bones Zygomatic bones Maxillae Inferior nasal conchae Vomer The maxillae (plural) are paired bones which are located between the orbit and the upper teeth, forming the upper part of the jaw. The maxilla consists of four processes: Zygomatic process – sticks out laterally to articulate with zygomatic bone Frontal process – projects superiorly and articulates with frontal bone Alveolar process …

Maxilla Read More »

Maxilla

Infraspinatus

Infraspinatus The structure indicated is the infraspinatus muscle of the rotator cuff. The infraspinatus muscle is one of the four muscles of the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff muscles are located in the posterior scapula region and serve to stabilise the glenohumeral joint. There are 4 rotator cuff muscles which can be remembered using the mnemonic SITS: Supraspinatus Infraspinatus Teres minor Subscapularis The supraspinatus and infraspinatus, as their names suggest originate in the fossae above and below the spine of the scapula respectively (supraspinatous and infraspinatous fossae). The supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor muscles insert on to the greater tubercle …

Infraspinatus Read More »

Infraspinatus