Articles

Masseter

Masseter The muscle highlighted is the masseter. This muscle is one of the muscles of mastication. The muscles of mastication include: Masseter Temporalis Medial pterygoid Lateral pterygoid The masseter is rectangular in shape and consists of a superficial part and a deep part. Origin: zygomatic arch and maxillary process of the zygomatic bone Insertion: lateral surface of ramus of mandible Innervation: masseteric nerve – a branch of the mandibular nerve (V3) Blood supply: masseteric artery To learn more about the muscles of mastication, check out this tutorial!
Masseter

Manubrium of Sternum

Manubrium of Sternum The highlighted structure is the manubrium of the sternum. The sternum consists of three parts Manubrium of the sternum Body of sternum Xiphoid process The manubrium of the sternum is the superior part of the sternum. The manubrium has the following features: Jugular notch (suprasternal notch) – you can palpate this notch yourself if you feel in the midline between the proximal ends of your clavicles. Articular site for clavicle Facet for attachment of first costal cartilage Demifacet for articulation with second costal cartilage Where the manubrium meets the body of the sternum, is a joint called …

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Manubrium

Isthmus of Thyroid Gland

Isthmus of Thyroid Gland The structure indicated is the isthmus of the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland sits anteriorly in the neck, just inferior to the thyroid cartilage. It is located deep to the overlying strap muscles (sternohyoid, sternothyroid and omohyoid). It has two lateral lobes connected in the centre by the isthmus. The isthmus lies over the 2nd and 3rd rings of the trachea The lateral lobes extend from the lateral aspects of the thyroid cartilage down as far the 6th ring of the trachea. Occasionally a pyramidal lobe is present, which is an upward extension of the isthmus, …

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Isthmus of Thyroid Gland

Cervical Canal

Cervical Canal The structure indicated is the cervical canal. The uterus consists of a body and a cervix. The cervix forms the neck of the uterus, and communicates inferiorly with the vagina at the external orifice (external os), and superiorly with the uterine cavity via the internal orifice (internal os). The cervical canal is the narrow passage which runs through the cervix. The inferior part of the cervix bulges into the superior aspect of the vagina and is called the vaginal portion of the cervix (above this is the supravaginal portion). The vaginal part of the cervix is known as …

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Cervical Canal

Arytenoid Cartilage

Arytenoid Cartilage The cartilage highlighted in yellow is the arytenoid cartilage of the larynx. The larynx consists of several cartilages, as well as lots of small muscles and a fibroelastic membrane. There are three pairs of small cartilages, and three large unpaired cartilages. The large unpaired cartilages include the cricoid cartilage, the thyroid cartilage and the epiglottis. The small paired cartilages include the arytenoid, the corniculate and the cuneiform cartilages. The arytenoid cartilages are shaped like little pyramids and consist of three surfaces: Posterior surface Antero-lateral surface Medial surface The arytenoid cartilage has a broad base which articulates with the …

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Arytenoid Cartilage

Inferior Colliculi

Inferior Colliculi The inferior colliculi together with the superior colliculi, are collectively referred to as the corpora quadrigemina and form the roof of the midbrain. The word colliculus actually means “lower hill” in Latin, describing the appearance of these structures. The superior colliculi are part of the visual system, whereas the inferior colliculi are involved in the auditory system. Auditory fibres project to the inferior colliculi, which then in turn project to the medial geniculate nucleus of the thalamus. From here, the fibres project to the auditory cortex within the temporal lobe. Learn about the basic anatomy of the brain …

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Inferior Colliculi

Biceps Brachii

Biceps Brachii The biceps brachii is a muscle in the anterior compartment of the arm. It has two heads, the long head and the short head. It is one of three muscles in the anterior compartment of the arm, the other two muscles being the brachialis and the coracobrachialis, which lie deep to it. The biceps muscle receives innervation via the musculocutaneous nerve and it functions mainly to supinate the forearm and flex the elbow. Despite being a relatively small muscle, the biceps brachii is one of the most highly trained muscles in the gym, along with the pectoral muscles …

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Biceps Brachii

Renal Pelvis

Renal Pelvis The renal pelvis is the proximal dilated aspect of the ureter in the kidney. It functions to funnel urine into the ureters. Urine empties from the renal papilla into the minor calyces, which in turn drain into the major calyces, and then into the renal pelvis. To learn more about the internal anatomy of the renal pelvis take a look at this video.
Renal pelvis highlighted in green

Olives of Medulla

Olives of Medulla The olives of the medulla, also known as the olivary bodies, are located on the ventral surface of the medulla oblongata of the brainstem, lateral to the medullary pyramids. The brainstem consists of the medulla, the pons and the midbrain. The olives contain the inferior olivary nucleus (the superior olivary nucleus is actually located in the pons). The olivary nucleus receives input from the motor and sensory cortices, and has important efferent connections with the cerebellum – these circuits are important in the control of movement.
Olives of Medulla

Pectoralis Major

Pectoralis Major The pectoralis major is one of the muscles in the pectoral region of the thorax. The other muscles in this region include the pectoralis minor and the subclavius. The pectoralis minor lies underneath the pectoralis major, and is a much smaller muscle – hence the name. The subclavius, as the name suggests, is located under (“sub”) the clavicle (“clavius”), attaching at one end to the bottom of the clavicle. And at the other to the first rib. The pectoralis major muscle has a few actions at the shoulder joint: flexion adduction medial rotation There are two main parts …

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Pectoralis Major Muscle